Until around 1850, the silk lace produced in Chantilly was known as blonde lace due to the natural colour of the silk thread from the cocoon of the silkworm.

Pale yellow in colour, Chantilly lace was then dyed black and was referred to as blonde noire. The fashion lasted until 1840 before it made way for black lace which became known as Chantilly lace.

The town’s heritage and lace museum has on display an exquisite collection of pieces, retracing the history of Chantilly and its lace.

 

Museum open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10.00-11.30 am
and 3.00-5.30 pm – 34 rue d’Aumale, Chantilly

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If Chantilly lace has earned a global reputation, the lace museum is an important destination on Chantilly’s tourist trail. The idea of Anne of Bavaria, it became the main industry of the region in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Black bobbin lace reached its peak in the Second Empire thanks to the wife of Napoleon III, Eugenia de Montijo, who launched the fashion across Europe.

The lace museum tells the history of Chantilly through one of its finest legacies.

 

Museum open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10.00-11.30 am
and 3.00-5.30 pm – 34 rue d’Aumale, Chantilly

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In 1730, the first china factory was opened in Chantilly by the Duke of Bourbon, who wanted to imitate Japanese porcelain or Kakiemon. Elegant and refined, the china made in Chantilly was instantly in a class of its own for the quality of the paste. The simple lines were inspired by the Oriental style, contrasting with the busy styles of the period.

An important milestone in Chantilly’s history, the manufacture of bone china in Chantilly was killed off in the 19th century when the factory shut down in 1870. Today, pieces are produced in Limoges and left blank then transported to Chantilly where they are hand painted true to 18th century tradition.

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